INFORMATION

On behalf of the Chulalongkorn Centre of Excellence for Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders, it is our pleasure to invite you to attend the 2019 Chulalongkorn International Forum on Parkinson’s Disease to be held at Chulalongkorn University Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand on 2 – 3 March, 2019. The theme of this meeting is ‘Listening to patient’s concerns; Toward a personalised therapy in Parkinson’s disease’ to commemorate the 10th anniversary of our centre in providing service, research and education to Parkinson’s disease patients, health and social care professionals in Thailand.

As we know, each and every individual with Parkinson’s Disease have different symptomatologies within what consists of motor and non-motor symptoms. Each and every patient have their own concerns and sets of challenges and response to treatment. It is prudent for us as a doctor to provide the best of care to enhance their quality of life so that they live as much a normal life as possible. In this era of precision medicine, we are on a road to providing individualised treatment to every patient.

Join us as we celebrate our advancement in care with a panel of international, regional and local leading experts in the field of Parkinson’s Disease with years of experience in taking care of patients. The 2019 Chulalongkorn International Forum on Parkinson’s Disease promises to be an educational and insightful platform for learning, sharing and updating about various patients concerns, their treatment and management options which will lead to personalised therapy. The forum will end with exciting real-case discussion by all the faculties.

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Thailand in March 2019.

Date

2019/03/02 – 2019/03/03

Venue

The Bhumisiri Mangkhalanusorn Building, the newest building in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, accommodates numerous facilities mainly dedicated to inpatient care. Nevertheless, fully-equipped auditoriums and classrooms enable it to facilitate medical students of Chulalongkorn University in their studies as well. Situated in close proximity to Bangkok’s city centre, The Bhumisiri Mangkhalanusorn Building and KCMH itself are easily accessible via various means of transport such as the skytrain, the subway and taxis. Directly across the building lies the Lumphini Park, where city goers gather in order to become immersed in nature and for once diverted from the traffic and skyscrapers. Shopping complexes like Silom Complex, Gaysorn Shopping Centre, Amarin Plaza and Central World are also reachable in walking distance, and while Siam Square takes quite a long walk to get to, it is only two stations away on the skytrain. Last but not least, for a little gimmick, check out the magnificent view from upper stories of the building.
The Bhumisiri Mangkhalanusorn Building
Address: 1873 Ratchadamri Rd, Khwaeng Pathum Wan, Khet Pathum Wan, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10330
Phone: +(66)2 256 4000

Secretariat

www.chulapd.org
Contact Email: info@chulapd.org

Registration Desk

The 370 Seats Meeting Room, 12th Floor, The Bhumisiri Mangkhalanusorn Building, Chulalongkorn University Hospital

Visa Requirement

Visa-Exempt Entry
Countries eligible for visa-exempt entry:

155 Countries allowed to enter Thailand under the VISA EXEMPTION RULE: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile , Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Laos, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macau, Malaysia, Monaco, Mongolia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Russia Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Vietnam
Website: http://www.thaiembassy.com

Here are the types of visas available depending on the purpose of travel that you can obtain from the Thai embassy or consulate:
- Transit Visa
- Tourist Visa
- Non-immigrant Visa (B, O, ED, OA etc.)
- Diplomatic/Official Visa
- Courtesy Visa

Here are the most common types of visas foreigners obtain for Thailand:
TOURIST (TR)
- Tourism in Thailand
- Not for Business or Employment purposes
- Allowed to stay up to 60 days
- Extension allowed for another 30 days
BUSINESS (B)
- Business in Thailand
- Employed or Sponsored by Thai Company
- Allowed to stay up to 90 days for single or 1 year for multiple entries

Language

English、Thai

Climate

The average temperature for March in Bangkok is between 26-34 degree Celsius.

Dress Code

Formal or smart casual attire is recommended during the entire meeting.

Liability And Insurance

Congress fee does not include insurance. All participants should arrange for their own insurance. Health and accident insurance is recommended and has to be purchased in your country of origin.

Roongroj Bhidayasiri

MD., FRCP.

Chulalongkorn International Forum Committee Chair

Pattamon Panyakaew

MD., MSc, FCRP (T)

Chulalongkorn International Forum Committee Secretariat

Priya Jagota

MD., MSc

Chulalongkorn International Forum Committee

Onanong Phokaewwarangkul

MD., PhD.

Chulalongkorn International Forum Committee

Jirada Sringren

MD., PhD.

Chulalongkorn International Forum Committee

Airport Information

Bangkok Airport (Suvarnabhumi International Airport) is Thailand’s biggest airport. It’s one of the coolest transport hubs in the world. The facilities are excellent and there are daily flights to every continent. You’ll find transport to and from the airport is quick and easy, too. The main arrivals and departure halls are bright and airy, which always helps. Bangkok’s main international airport has such a unique design it is one of the most Instagrammed places in the world. Everyone wants a picture of Suvarnabhumi Airport, with its long tubular corridors made from glass and steel. Around 58 million passengers travel through Suvarnabhumi Airport every year. It is the international arrival point in Thailand and a major transfer hub for Southeast Asia. Bangkok International Airport 16 miles outside town. But it’s easy to get to Bangkok city centre, either via the Airport Link or taxi – although be warned of traffic jams during weekday rush hours.

Bangkok Airport Link

Bangkok Airport Rail Link is a commuter rail line connecting Suvarnabhumi Airport to Phaya Thai (BTS) station via Makkasan Station (MRT Phetchaburi).The Airport Rail link operates daily from 06:00 to 24:00, with commuter City Line trains departing every 10 minutes during peak hours (06:00-09:00 and 16:00-20:00) and 15 minutes off peak and weekends.

Metered Taxi (or Taxi Meter)

From the Arrival Hall on the second floor, you will need to take an elevator down to the first floor to find the designated taxi stands at Entry Gate 4. Simply queue up and tell your final destination to the booth officer, then a taxi driver will escort you to his vehicle. Please note that you need to pay the driver an extra 50 baht courtesy fee, on top of all toll way fees and the final taxi fare. Taken all these fees into account, it should cost you a total of 350-400 baht for a 40-minute ride to downtown Bangkok. Service is available 24 hours.

Don Mueang Airport Transportation

Book transfers to and from Bangkok Don Mueang Airport (DMK), taxis, vans, and executive cars through our search engine, it’s easy and fast to use!

Metered Taxi

Taxi Stand: Located in front of the Arrival Halls International & Domestic Passenger Terminals Fare: Based on meter plus 50 baht airport surcharge The taxi fare rate within Bangkok and Greater Bangkok is charged by the meter plus a 50 baht airport surcharge. In addition, if taking the tollway, passengers are required to pay the tollway fee.The taxi fare rate outside Greater Bangkok and other provinces is fixed by BIA without the 50 Baht surcharge for the driver. Passengers should keep part 4 of the taxi ticket as evidence for any service complaint they may have.Transportation Bangkok's traffic is notorious - with good reason. It's very easy to get caught up in gridlock traffic any time of the day or night, and waste a lot of valuable time in the process. However, with excellent and modern public transport systems in place, Bangkok is surprisingly easy to navigate your way around. The Skytrain (BTS) and underground (MRT) rail systems connect the main shopping, entertainment and business areas of the city, while river taxis and express boats can be used to explore many historic sites and attractions at the riverside. Taxis are cheap and appear on virtually every corner at almost any time. Tuk-tuks, once a big Bangkok attraction, are slowly disappearing in favour of more comfortable transport, but are still worth a ride at least once.

Bangkok BTS

This Bangkok BTS Route Guide has been designed to help you discover all the interesting sites and activities surrounding each station so that you can get more out of your BTS-hopping experience through Bangkok.

THERE ARE TWO BTS LINES:

SILOM LINE runs west to south, between the National Stadium in the Siam shopping area and Bang Wa in Thonburi (across the Chao Phraya River).

SUKHUMVIT LINE runs north to east from Mo Chit to Bearing. The two lines meet at Siam Station, and also connect at two points with the underground (MRT) – at Sala Daeng Station (Silom Line) and Asok Station (Sukhumvit Line). A new train arrives every 3 - 6 minutes or so between 06:30 and midnight. The last train leaves between 23:30 and 23:50. Fares start at 15 baht for one stop (more info about the BTS Passes).

Note that trains can get pretty full during peak hours (07:00 - 09:00 and 16:00 - 19:00), as the BTS has also become the choice mode of transport for people living and working in Bangkok.

Bangkok MRT (Underground)

Fast and efficient, the Mass Rapid Transit network (MRT) serves 18 stations and stretches for 20 km in a horseshoe shape from Hua Lamphong in the South (near Chinatown) to Bang Sue in the north. Trains arrive every 5-7 minutes, and connect to the BTS Skytrain at Sukhumvit and Silom stations. Stops of particular interest to visitors include Kampaengphet (Chatuchak Weekend Market, Or Tor Kor Market and Rod Fai Market), Sukhumvit (Asok BTS Skytrain), Silom (Saladaeng BTS Skytrain, Pat Pong Night Market and Lumpini Park) and Hua Lamphong (Chinatown and Central Railway Station). The Petchaburi Station is about 300m from the Airport Rail Link’s Makkasan Interchange Station, where you can board the express train to Suvarnabhumi International Airport.

How to access the Bhumisiri Mangala Anusorn Building by BTS Sky Train and MRT

BTS Sky Train (Silom line) to Saladaeng station (exit 5) then use the walkway to connect the Bhumisiri Mangala Anusorn Building

MRT (underground) to Silom station (exit 2) then use the walkway to connect the Bhumisiri Mangala Anusorn Building

BTS-MRT

Tuk-tuks

Tuk-tuks or 'sam lor' (three-wheeled) used to be everyone's favourite way of getting around Bangkok before the BTS, MRT and colourful taxis took over. Originating from an old-fashioned rickshaw during the second World War, a tuk-tuk is essentially a rickshaw with a small engine fitted in. Tuk-tuks have become one of Bangkok's most recognisable transportation features, and are still popular among tourists and visitors. Riding a tuk-tuk is more of an experience rather than a practical way to get around. So, if it's your first time in The Big Mango, there's no harm in giving it a go.

Taxi

Besides the BTS and MRT, the easiest and most convenient way to get around Bangkok is by taxi. Most taxis are new, spacious and, in addition to the traditional green-yellow and red-blue, they also come in funky colours like bright orange, red and even pink. Finding a taxi is not a hassle, especially around hotels, shopping malls and other tourist attractions. However, you're in for a really long wait when it rains, and during rush hours. The fare starts at 35 baht, and stays there for the first two kilometres. Thereafter, the fare gradually works its way up with 2 baht at a time (roughly per kilometre). A surcharge applies in traffic jams (1.25 baht per metre when moving under 6 km per hour). Typical taxi fares for going a few kilometres are around 50 baht. Communication can be a problem with the majority of Bangkok's taxi drivers as they often speak little English. Improvise, and be imaginative. Overall, there's never a shortage of taxis in a city that never sleeps, excepts when it starts raining of course. They're cheap and available virtually 24 hours a day. Meter taxis now predominate, but sometimes you may have to politely (but firmly) ask them to switch the meter on to save negotiating later. Since taxis are cheap and the drivers work all hours in traffic that is legendary, a small tip is often appreciated.

Website http://www.bangkok.com

Discover Thailand

https://thai.tourismthailand.org

Located in Southeast Asia, Thailand covers a total area of approximately 513,000 square kilometers (198,000 square miles) and is the 50th largest country in the world and the 12th largest in Asia!

Located in Southeast Asia, Thailand covers a total area of approximately 513,000 square kilometers (198,000 square miles) and is the 50th largest country in the world and the 12th largest in Asia!

The north of the country borders Myanmar and Laos. The northernmost point is Amphoe Mae Sai, Chiang Rai Province, with tourist attractions like Mae Sai Market, Golden Triangle, Wat Phra That Doi Wao, and Wat Thampla (locally known as Money Temple).

The south of the country is next to Malaysia and the Gulf of Thailand. The southernmost point is Amphoe Betong, Yala Province, which contains tourist attractions like La-ong Rung Waterfall (Rainbow Waterfall), Chaloem Phrakiat Waterfall (I-yer Khem Waterfall), Bala-Hala Forest, the sea of fog at Microwave Mountain, and Betong Hot Spring.

The east of the country borders Cambodia and Laos. The easternmost point is Amphoe Si Mueang Mai, Ubon Ratchathani Province, with tourist attractions like Sai Rung Waterfall (Rainbow Waterfall), Kaeng Chu Kan, and Hin Huai Soob Stone Yard.

The west of the country is next to Myanmar and the Andaman Sea. The westernmost point is Amphoe Mae Sariang, Mae Hong Son Province, with tourist attractions like Wat Phra That Chom Thong, Wat Phra That Chom Chaeng, Wat Phra That Chom Kitti, Salawin National Park, Bua Tong Field at Doi Mae Ho, and Mae Sawan Noi Waterfall.

Thailand is divided into six regions: North, Northeast, Central, South, East, and West.

The North is the country’s highlands. Vast mountain ranges dominate the landscape and are the source of many rivers. Doi Inthanon, Thailand’s tallest peak, is famous among tourists during the cool season for the Mae Kha Ning (frost flower) phenomenon as well as a sea of fog, nature trails, waterfalls, and botanical scenes.

The Northeast features some of the beautiful northern highlands but also gorgeous plateaus. Hom Mali Rice (Thai Jasmine Rice) is grown here and exported all over the world. The Mekong River is a very prominent river that runs through the area. Popular places along the Mekong River include Amphoe Chiang Khan of Loei Province, Tha Sadet Market in Nong Khai Province, Indochina Market in Mukdahan Province, and Sam Pan Bok Grand Canyon in Ubon Ratchathani Province.

Central Thailand is mainly plains and is a huge area of rice farming and agriculture. The Chao Phraya River is very important to Thailand’s history. Interesting places to visit are ancient historical temples, Bang Pa-in Royal Palace and Bang Sai Royal Folk Arts and Crafts Center in Ayutthaya Province, and Koh Kret in Nonthaburi Province. And if you like shopping, there are plenty of local markets in Bangkok for you to explore such as Wang Lang Market, Tha Phra Chan Market, Saphan Phut (Memorial Bridge) Night Market, and Asiatique Night Market. There are also Chao Phraya boat tours from Bangkok to Ayutthaya every day.

The South many contains beautiful beaches and islands in the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea. Well-known tourist destinations are Phuket Province, Koh Samui, Koh Phi Phi, Koh Lipe, and Koh Tao.

Eastern Thailand is half mountain, half ocean. Although there aren’t many provinces here, it still has a lot of amazing sights and stunning locations to visit just like the rest of Thailand such as Koh Samed, Koh Chang, Koh Mak, Koh Lan, Koh Si Chang, Bang Saen Beach, Pattaya, Jomtien Beach, Laem Mae Phim Beach, and Mae Ram Phueng Beach.

The West is mountainous with many woodlands, waterfalls, and dams, which is why there are a number of national parks in the area. Due to its geographical variation, there is a lot of incredible Thai nature to see in this western region. Tourist attractions include Thong Pha Phum National Park, Srinakharin Dam, Vajiralongkorn Dam, Sai Yok Noi Waterfall, Sai Yok Yai Waterfall, Erawan Waterfall, Mon Bridge, Mueang Sing Historical Park, Three Pagodas Pass, Wat Wang Wiwekaram, Underwater City, The Bridge of the River Kwai, Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, and World War II Museum and Art Gallery.

Thailand has three seasons: wet, cool, and hot. Depending on where and when you travel Thailand, it is always good to check the weather before visiting as some areas are better in certain seasons.

Attractions

Bangkok, Thailand’s capital, is a large city known for ornate shrines and vibrant street life. The boat-filled Chao Phraya River feeds its network of canals, flowing past the Rattanakosin royal district, home to opulent Grand Palace and its sacred Wat Phra Kaew Temple. Nearby is Wat Pho Temple with an enormous reclining Buddha and, on the opposite shore, Wat Arun Temple with its steep steps and Khmer-style spire.

Traditional teak buildings like the grand Vimanmek Palace and the residence-turned-museum Jim Thompson House contrast with the city’s skyline of modern high-rises. Shopping options range from the upscale mega-malls of the Ratchaprasong district to the thousands of tiny stalls at overflowing Chatuchak Weekend Market. The city’s renowned food scene spans traditional street-cart snacks – spicy, sour, sweet and salty – to upscale international restaurants.

Taste of Thailand

https://thai.tourismthailand.org

Thai cuisine is well known for its spiciness, with Som Tam (a spicy papaya salad) being a famous example. In fact, however, the secret to Thai food is a balance of five flavors: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Some Thai dishes have a careful blend of all these tantalizing tastes. Others are served with something to help deal with the overpowering spiciness. For example, Tom Yum Goong, which is sour and spicy, is often paired with an omelet or rice. This could be the reason rice is always part of a Thai meal.

As well as many herbs and spices used in Thai food, fish sauce is often used in a similar way salt is, as it mellows the taste. This means vegetarians will have to take this into account and be more careful when choosing food in Thailand.

There is a great variety of Thai food for you to try, both main dishes and desserts. You can also try local foods, which are different in each part of the country. Northern Thai meals usually feature sticky rice, Nam Prik (spicy chili paste), fresh vegetable, and soup, northeastern Thai meals are famous for their spicy and sour dishes and an essential condiment Pla Ra (fermented fish sauce), while traditional southern foods are well-known for their herbs and spices.

There is also a lot of Chinese influence. Many Chinese restaurants and fusion foods exist in Thailand side by side with the authentic Thai cuisine restaurants.